University of Wisconsin–Madison

04.06.16 Kaltura MediaSpace with Josh Harder

Josh HarderJosh Harder from DoIT Academic Technology shared how to use Kaltura MediaSpace, a social video and rich media portal. Recently added, Interactive Video Quizzing (IVQ) lets instructors embed short multiple-choice quiz questions in videos as knowledge-checks for student learning.

Activity SheetActive Teaching Lab full schedule

Josh’s Kaltura MediaSpace Story

Takeaways

  • In webcam recordings with screencast, allow room on your slides for the video.
  • Attach documents to videos once they’ve been uploaded to MediaSpace (e.g., an assignment associated with a video, or background reading, etc).
  • Downloaded questions for Interactive Video Quizzing (IVQ) include timecode of questions.
  • IVQ integrates with Canvas, and scores go right into the gradebook.
  • There are more in-depth notes here.

Interactive Video Quizzing (IVQ)

When used effectively, formative assessment can be a very powerful way to help students learn (Noyce & Hickey, 2011). Fortunately formative assessment and video just got a little easier today thanks to Kaltura MediaSpace Interactive Video Quizzing (IVQ). During today’s session I will explore how you can use this new feature to provide quick and easy knowledge checks for your students.

IVQ helps you help your students by providing a verification. It pauses the video and let’s you ask a question related to what the student just saw. It is the asynchronous, digital equivalent of checking in with your students to see if they understood what you just said. It asks, “Are we on the same page?” In the style of assessment for learning (Black, Harrison, Lee, Marshall, & Wiliam, 2004), it gives your students a moment to stop and think about whether or not they understand. If not, they can roll the video back and try again.

Easily Record Your Screen and Webcam with CaptureSpace Lite

CaptureSpace Lite is a simple tool meant to make it quick and easy for you and your students to engage in a conversation online. That conversation can come in many forms. You can record your screen and PowerPoint slides in a lecture format. You could do a quick webcam/video update introducing the unit’s major topics. You could record an audio response to a complicated discussion post. Your students could then do the same in response to anything you post. Using media in this way has the potential to personalize your online and hybrid/blended courses in different ways compared to just text-based communication.

 

References

Black, P., Harrison, C., Lee, C., Marshall, B., & Wiliam, D. (2004). Working inside the Black Box: Assessment for Learning in the Classroom. Phi Delta Kappan, 86(1), 8.

Noyce, P. E., & Hickey, D. T. (Eds.). (2011). New Frontiers in Formative Assessment. Harvard Education Press. 8 Story Street First Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138. Tel: 888-437-1437; Tel: 617-495-3432; Fax: 978-348-1233; e-mail: hepg@harvard.edu; Web site: http://www.hepg.org/hep.

Leave a Reply