University of Wisconsin–Madison

04.08.16 Omeka.net with Anna Andrzejewski

Anna AndrzejewskiHear Anna Andrzejewski from Art History share how she used omeka.net, a web-publishing and digital exhibition platform, to structure student-curated course content assignments.

Activity Sheet • Active Teaching Lab full schedule

Anna’s omeka.net Story

Takeaways

  • Allow yourself time to get to know the tool, including customizing it for your course / discipline.
  • Plan to scaffold your students in their use of it, including getting them signed in, and getting them used to the tool before a high stakes assignment is due.
  • A curator has the power, as in a brick-and-mortar museum, to choose which pieces are displayed in their “exhibit” from their “collection.”
  • Dublin Core is a standard way to categorize any type of digital item, and having students use it in this context is good training, if that standard is used in your discipline.
  • Since some major museums use this site for their collections, having art history students, or students in similar disciplines, use Omeka is a way for them to engage with the professional world.
  • Students can do collaborative projects, which allows them to contribute to something worth showing off, that is bigger than their own work.

Teaching with Omeka 

More examples (from omeka.org/codex/Teach_with_Omeka)

  • Jeffrey McClurken (Associate Professor and Chair of History and American Studies at the University of Mary Washington). “Teaching with Omeka”. ProfHacker blog, Chronicle of Higher Education, August 9, 2010.
  • Jeffrey McClurken (Associate Professor and Chair of History and American Studies at the University of Mary Washington), “Teaching and Learning with Omeka: Discomfort, Play, and Creating Public, Online, Digital Collections,” Learning Through Digital Media Experiments in Technology and Pedagogy, 2011.

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